Villa Manin

Passariano (UD)

Villa Manin is an eighteenth-century complex, harmonious and imposing at the same time, now home to important international art exhibitions. It is one of the largest Venetian villas in Italy and was the prestigious home of the noble Manin family, including Lodovico, the last doge of the Republic of Venice. Right here in 1797 Lodovico had to attend the signing of the Treaty of Campoformido with which Napoleon decreed the end of the Serenissima.

True jewel of art and history, with its 8500 square meters of halls, corridors, frescoes, historic buildings, the chapel of Sant’Andrea and the eighteen hectares of English landscaped park, embodies the European dream of one of the most prestigious families of the Republic of San Marco, ambitious to the point of wanting to rival the most sumptuous courts of the continent.

The villa of Passariano also represented a great plan: to connect the traffic that came by water from the Venice lagoon and the Upper Adriatic with those that descended the Tagliamento valley, coming from central Europe. To achieve this, the Manins for centuries committed themselves to creating adequate infrastructures, also equipping the villa, surrounded by thousands of hectares of land ownership, with all the useful tools to transform the product of labor in the fields.

Such an ambitious project had to be enriched by embellishment that transformed the initial “country house” into a real place of wonders, capable of surprising the traveler and of witnessing the prestige and riches of the family who had built it . Artists, also from foreign countries, were called to create works: frescoes, sculptures and stuccos, between baroque and rococo, which embellished the spaces of the villa and the park.

Villa Manin

Piazza Manin, 10

Passariano (UD)